Dissecting Pre-Paid Legal Ripoff Rumors – Does a Pre-Paid Legal Ripoff Really Exist?

In the age of the internet, it’s often tough to sort through legitimate companies from pure ripoffs. This article aims to explain the good and bad elements of the popular network marketing company, Pre-Paid Legal. Ultimately, is there a scheme behind the Pre-Paid Legal ripoff rumors? Or is this a company that can be trusted?

Who’s Behind Pre-Paid Legal

The company was founded in 1972 by a man named Harland C. Stonecipher in Oklahoma. Since inception, it’s dealt with a variety of company lawsuits, and most recently, a buyout by MidOcean Partners, a private equity firm in New York. The New York Times reported that this acquisition cost MidOcean around $650 million, and happened in 2011 after Stonecipher stepped down from his role as chief executive.

Amidst a continuing investigation by the Securities and Exchange Commission concerning membership information and the reasons behind Stonecipher’s resignation, it’s tough to take an unbiased look at the company and opportunity they provide.

True or False? The Pre-Paid Legal Ripoff

But it’s not all gloom and doom for PPL. The company currently serves over 1.4 million families in both the United States and Canada, helping people find and retain attorneys for legal matters like real estate transactions, wills and estate planning, mortgage refinancing, moving traffic violations, creditor trouble, inadequate health care, and automobile or property damage. They currently ’employ’ thousands of representatives in the United States.

Pre-Paid Legal Ripoff Rumors Laid to Rest

The bottom line concerning legitimacy is this: if the company were performing illegal actions, or were in fact operating as a pyramid scheme, they would be charged for such occurrences and taken out of business. And based on the fact that MidOcean recently purchased the company for a large amount of money, it’s tough to think that PPL is on the outs.

The biggest question for network marketers, instead, should be about their investment in the company, and whether it makes sense for them to join. While there is no such thing as the “Pre-Paid Legal ripoff,” it’s still important to evaluate an opportunity and your ability to create real wealth with a home based business.

One big issue many new network marketers have is how to market, and who to market to. Luckily, there are a lot of resources on the web that can help new network marketers manage this. Learning all aspects of internet marketing, like SEO, driving traffic, setting up an effective website and opt-in, and generating high quality leads are all things that network marketers need to know. They aren’t tough to learn, but it requires a bit of patience and time spent reviewing the right materials in order to build a successful network marketing business with a company like PPL.

13 Million People Living Below the Poverty Line to Be Denied Legal Aid

In 2006/2007, the governments own statistics show that over 13 million of our population were considered to be living below the poverty line although this figure is rising at a rate of around 1 million every 2 years. (For single adults you are considered to be living below the poverty line if your income is less than 60% of average which is around £112 per week or just under £6000 per year) Most of these still have an income above which they will be required to fund their own legal expenses given that only single unemployed people with no dependents fall short of the £3398 benchmark with a benefits income of around £3328. Put quite simply if you have a child you are not entitled to legal aid in full.

Effectively this means that with the exception of homeless unemployed benefits people there effectively is not a single person in this country which would be entitled to 100% legal aid funding. If a person fails to provide their proportion of legal expenses they could face losing their homes in enforcement action, a move akin to the elderly in care homes being forced to sell their houses to fund their existence after a life of contributing to the very state which now denies their dignity. Once released the innocent will no longer have a home to live in, families will be torn apart further than they are already by the justice system and the state will ultimately have to pay for the damage it has reaped as a result.

Clearly with over 13 million of the affected population living in what is already considered to be poverty, the refusal to fund any legal representation in full will result in either their poverty being compounded or their legal representation restricted. Both of which are a breach of any socially acceptable standard in any developed country in the 21st century not least one which ratified the ECHR which this latest move so defiantly and blatantly ignores.

Article 6 Paragraph 3c.
“Everyone charged with a criminal offence has the following minimum rights:
(c) to defend himself in person or through legal assistance of his own choosing or, if he has not sufficient means to pay for legal assistance, to be given it free when the interests of justice so require;”

The only foreseeable outcome of this is that many more will be wrongly convicted of crimes since they will through the denial of adequate legal representation be unable to prove their innocence against a financially unrestricted prosecution procedure.

It naturally follows that there will be more appeals lodged on the legal grounds of not being provided with an adequate defence, which in turn will result in compensation being issued by the government through Article 5’s enforceable compensation requirements. Worse than that even the genuinely guilty would be entitled to the same and could be wrongly released (Look out for more incidents similar to the recent murders of two French Students).

My suggestion? Solicitors up and down the country should unite until this decision is reversed offering their services for appeals on a pro-bono basis receiving a percentage of the enforceable compensation awards. In this way, ultimately the state will be required to pay out more as a result of this ill-conceived and morally wrong ruling implemented against the advice of those they paid to advise them. 

Is Legal Marijuana Bigger Than The Internet of Things?

The greatest innovation in history –

Nothing on Earth today (and I mean nothing at all), not smartphones, automotives, aerospace, real estate, gold, oil, software, biotechnology, nothing… is growing as much or as fast as the market for legal marijuana.

Consider this: By 2020, the market for legal marijuana will top $22.8 billion (not million, but billion with a B).The legal market for cannabis “could be bigger than the National Football League, which saw $12 billion of revenue in 2015. Between 2016 and 2029, the projected growth of marijuana is expected to reach $100 billion – 1,308% growth.

Estimates place the number of some time marijuana users in the neighborhood of 50 million people. As many as 7.6 million indulge on a daily basis. Out of the 83.3 million milllennials, fully 68%of them want cannabis to be legal and available. Once legalization takes hold everywhere, dozens of already established firms – in the tobacco industry… in agriculture and irrigation… in pharmacueticals – are going to want to jump in without hesitation. And if you want more proof that marijuana is going mainstream, consider this…

On Nov 8th, tens of millions of Americans in nine states headed to the polls and voted on the future of marijuana. California, Massachusetts, Maine and Nevada voted to legalize the recreational use of marijuana. And voters in Arkansas, Florida, North Dakota and Montana passed ballot initiatives legalizing medical marijuana. Only Arizona, where recreational cannabis was up for a vote, decided against legalization. Together, these states (excluding Arizona) represent a total population of 75 million people. That means one in five Americans – 20% of us – woke up on Aug 9th finding themselves in a state where medical and/or recreational marijuana is legal for adults 21 and over.

Even Hollywood celebrities are getting into the act. Many folks already know about the weed-related business activities of Snoop Dog, country music legend Willie Nelson and actor and comedian Tommy Chong. Fewer know that Grammy Award winning singer Melissa Etheridge is developing her own line of cannabis-infused wine and TV talk show host Whoopi Goldberg is launching a line of medical marijuana products aimed at women. And people listen to Hollywood icons. Nothing is more mainstream than the TV sitcom.

On July 13th in 2016, Variety revealed that Netflix is planning to air a sitcom set inside a legal pot dispensary. Called DisJointed, the show is the brainchild of TV genius Chuck Lorre, creator of such mainstream blockbusters as The Big Bang Theory and Two and a Half Men. A recent poll by Quinnipiac University found that 89 percent of voters in the United States believe that adults should be allowed legal access to medical marijuana when a doctor prescribes it. And the U.S.A. is not the only country poised to loosen the reins on marijuana. Israel, Canada, Spain, Mexico, Australia, Uruguay, Jamaica, Germany and Columbia have either legalized or decriminalized possession.

Since 1972, marijuana has been classified as a Schedule 1 controlled substance. Schedule 1 drugs are those considered to lack medical use and present a high potential for abuse. As a Schedule 1 drug, marijuana gets grouped alongside heroin, LSD, and ecstasy. But in the face of mounting pressure from the doctors, medical researchers, state governments and Congress, the Drug Enforcement Agency (DEA) have come under pressure to downgrade marijuana to a Schedule II drug, or maybe even a Schedule III.

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, by 2030 one fifth of the population – 72 million Americans – will be 65 or older. Those Baby Boomers will all confront a slew of age-related ailments, such as glaucoma, cancer, arthritis and back pain. As it happens, cannabis-based remedies are uniquely suited to treating those diseases. So, as the elderly population grows, so will the size of the medical marijuana market. Social acceptance of cannabis will grow as well, as millions of people discover the benefits of medical marijuana for themselves.

A single marijuana dispensary could bring in more than $676 million a year. Not all of that cash comes from weed itself. Most folks have already heard about things like “pot brownies.” But the market for marijuana “edibles” goes for beyond that. There are weed desserts and weed energy drinks. In fact, we’re even about to see the opening of the world’s first weed distillery.

For people averse to inhaling smoke, there are sites that offer THC-laden capsules, lip balms, hash bath oils, topical compound, and even THC patches that provide “accurate dosing… a quick onset and unsurpassed duration.” Thirsty users can enjoy THC-infused coffees, sodas, and sparkling waters. Aside from the market boom in recreational cannabis, medicinal marijuana and derivatives have also been seeing brisk growth, and for good reason.

Cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy and radiation usually lose their appetite and have sensitive stomachs. But if they don’t eat, the treatments aren’t as effective. Cannabis has been proven to help stimulate the appetite and settle the stomach. There is also new work being done with cannabis oil that shows promise treating epilepsy, multiple sclerosis, some cancers, and even rheumatoid arthritis. The oil is also effective for insomnia.

For most of the 20th century, doctors knew little about the working of out most important organ, the human brain. Brain cells dictate almost one of our sensations, thoughts, and actions sending signals that trigger appetite and hunger. Marijuana seems to bridge the gap. The voters in state after start are quickly coming to an agreement that cannabis is in fact medicine. Momentum is only going in one direction.