PrePaid Legal Leads – An Overview of Generating PrePaid Legal Leads

Pre-Paid Legal is a company founded in 1972 which provides the everyday person with a variety of legal services for a low monthly fee. The company states that because 71% of American households needed legal assistance in the past 12 months, their services help decrease the costs of expensive legal fees by providing a monthly fee and service guarantee to their clients.

In addition, Pre-Paid Legal offers a network marketing opportunity for those looking to create a home based business.

One of the biggest issues for network marketers is determining where to get leads for their new business. Both seasoned and novice marketers often rely upon friends and family to begin their business, and once their “warm market” is completely tapped, they get frustrated, and oftentimes, quit. This article aims to describe the opportunity with a company like Pre-Paid Legal, and also discuss the various ways that Pre-Paid Legal leads can be obtained by any network marketer.

How Pre-Paid Legal Works

Pre-Paid Legal works much like medical reimbursement plans or HMO’s. “Members” purchase a legal expense plan for around $26 per month, and receive access to legal services. Right now, the company serves about 1.4 million families in North America.

Network marketers can join the opportunity by investing $249 into the company. In return, reps are give sales aids and support, field training, home office support, marketing supplies, and online associate services.

How to Get Pre-Paid Legal Leads

Although joining the opportunity is fairly low-cost, one of the biggest questions that new network marketers end up asking themselves is, “How can I recruit more members into my downline to really make money?”

It’s true that you need to build a deep network of representatives to make this type of opportunity worth your while. But how can you reach these untapped markets of people who wish to be home-based entrepreneurs?

First, it’s important to understand the difference in paid and unpaid leads. Paid leads can be purchased in bulk from lead-generating companies. This can be a good option for extremely busy people with plenty of capital. But the danger of paid leads is that you never know where they came from, or how they were generated. There have been may horror stories of network marketers forking over big bucks for leads, only to learn that those leads weren’t warm, or they had already been tapped several times by network marketers before. That’s simply a waste of time and money.

Getting leads yourself depends on a few things. First is a strong web presence and an understanding of basic SEO and traffic driving. Second is fantastic web design. Once people find your site, getting them to opt-in with a great site design and incredible offer is key. A third element is social media, blogging, and forums. Becoming a part of an online community is a great way to spread word-of-mouth about your opportunity, and reach out to those who are looking for an opportunity like yours.

Ultimately, most newcomers (and even seasoned reps) struggle with lead generation, and it truly is one of the most important aspects of building a successful network marketing business. But it’s possible to learn these skills and build up the techniques necessary to create high quality leads yourself. By leveraging your online presence, you can learn to reach thousands of people each day and add representatives into a profitable downline.

Choice of Legal Entity Structure in Thailand

Private limited company

By far the most prevalent form of entity that is used in Thailand is the private limited company. A private limited company is simply a company that has at least 3 shareholders (all of which can be US nationals and/or corporations once the Treaty privileges are invoked) and at least 1 director who is resident (domiciled) in Thailand (who may also be a US national).

The liability of the shareholders is limited to the amount of the private limited company’s share capital. The shareholders appoint director(s), who act according to a registered set of articles and memorandum of association, both of which remain under the control of the shareholders.

The business activities of a Thai private limited company are set out in its memorandum. The activities are usually drafted in very wide terms and provided the memorandum does not allow any of the 6 restricted business activities under the Treaty, a private limited company would usually be able to undertake virtually any kind of activity that a US corporation would require of it to undertake in Thailand. But whilst a private limited company is the most widely known and most common form of doing business in Thailand, it may not be the most advantageous structure for tax.

As the activities of a private limited company are revenue-generating activities, it is therefore liable to all the corporate and transaction taxes payable by taxable entities in Thailand, the two main ones being corporate income tax, which is payable at the rate of 30% of the net income earned by the entity plus profits remittance tax at the rate of 10% of net profits remitted out of Thailand (equating to 37% income tax on net income), and VAT at the current rate of 7% on all sales of goods or provision of services by the Thai private limited company.

Representative office

In terms of its legal attributes, a representative office entity is the same as a branch office, i.e. an arm of the US corporation that forms it. But whereas a branch office conducts activities for commercial gain (i.e. for revenue-generating purposes), a representative office conducts its activities for its head office only – not for any consumer, i.e. a representative office conducts non revenue-earning activities. And as the activities are non revenue-earning, the Thai Revenue Department has prescribed that provided a representative office complies with the rules and conditions for representative offices, it shall not be subject to either income tax in Thailand or VAT in Thailand.

A representative office entity in Thailand is the right tax-effective and cost-effective choice for a US corporation carrying out any non revenue- earning activities in Thailand, such as:

  • Sourcing goods and services in Thailand for the US corporation.
  • Checking and controlling goods purchased or goods manufactured in Thailand for the US corporation.
  • Providing information and advice in relation to goods sold or services provided by the US corporation to consumers in Thailand.
  • Propagation of information concerning new goods or services of the head office; and/or
  • Reporting on matters in Thailand to the US corporation.

The above activities are those listed in the Thai Commerce Ministry guidance for representative offices, and in the case of a US corporation’s activities in Thailand not exactly fitting into the guidance, but are nevertheless, non revenue- generating activities (such as, for example, a US corporation is required to research/gather information in Thailand and report back to the US head office only), it would be a worthwhile exercise to seriously consider a representative office entity for the activity in Thailand.

Branch office

Similarly to a private limited company entity, a Thai branch office of a US corporation would usually be able to undertake virtually any kind of activity that a US corporation would require it to undertake in Thailand (except for, of course, the six restricted business activities under the Treaty).

But unlike a private limited company, a branch office is the exact same legal entity as the US corporation that forms it, and therefore, a US corporation forming a branch office assumes all liability for the operations of the branch office in Thailand.

That being said, however, if it is the case that the business activities in Thailand requires the US corporation’s guarantee of performance of the activities in Thailand and/or the activities in Thailand will be conducted for a finite period of time after which time the activities in Thailand would cease (for example, business activities involving a particular project to be carried out for a period of time in Thailand) then a branch office entity could be a bit more favorable.

A branch office in Thailand pays the same 30% rate of corporate income tax as a private limited company plus the same 10% profits remittance tax (making the total income tax payable equal to 37%) and the same rate of VAT (current rate of 7%) on all sales of goods and provision of services by the branch office.

But whilst there are no major Thai tax payable differences between a branch office and a Thai private limited company, an exit from a branch office entity in Thailand is far less cumbersome, far less time consuming and therefore far less than an exit from a Thai private limited company entity, which is required to comply with all the legal dissolution and liquidation procedures prescribed in the Thailand Civil and Commercial Code.

Regional office

Unlike for a branch office and the similarly for a representative office, the Thailand Revenue Department has prescribed that regional office entities in Thailand are not subject to corporate income tax or VAT in Thailand.

And similarly as for representative offices, the Thailand Ministry of Commerce has prescribed that regional office entities shall not undertake activities in Thailand for commercial gain, but shall undertake non revenue-earning activities for the head office company only.

The prescribed non revenue-earning activities for regional office entities are as follows:

  • Coordination or supervision of operations;
  • Consultation or management services;
  • Personnel training or development;
  • Financial management;
  • Marketing & sales promotion management;
  • Product development; and
  • Research and development services.
  • Regional operating headquarters

Finally, for a US corporation that is carrying out the types of business activities listed above for regional offices, but those activities are being conducted for commercial gain, i.e. a charge is made by the regional office to the branches or affiliated companies in SE Asia for the services rendered to them by the regional office, the US corporation would be wise to consider a type of legal entity in Thailand known as a Regional Operating Headquarters (ROH).

An ROH entity in Thailand has the same legal attributes as a private limited company, but it is additionally registered as an ROH entity under the Thai Revenue Code, which provides ROH entities the following exceptional tax privileges:

  • 0% income tax on income generated from branches/affiliates outside Thailand; and
  • 10% income tax on income generated from branches/affiliates in Thailand.

should note that whilst the Treaty of Amity may override the Thai FBA in relation to ownership, it does not however override the Thai FBA in relation to the minimum capital requirements of foreign entities in Thailand.

Thus, for any of the legal entities of company, branch office, representative office or regional office, a minimum amount of Bt 3 million (or about $100,000) is required for establishment of the entity in Thailand. This minimum amount of Bt 3 million forms the “capital” of the entity (similar, if you like, to share capital), it shall be actually remitted into a Thai Baht bank account (you cannot hold this sum in a USD account in Thailand) and it is required to stay in Thailand under the termination of the entity in Thailand, but of course, it can be used for the purposes of the entity.

For an ROH in Thailand, the minimum amount of capital is increased to Bt 10 million (or about $330,000).

Minimum capital requirements for each non-Thai (foreign national) employee in Thailand

You need to note however, that in addition to the minimum capital requirements under the Thai FBA, Thailand’s Foreign Employment Act prescribes that for work permit and immigration purposes, the employer entity in Thailand shall have paid-up capital of at least Bt 2 million (or around $67,000) per foreign national employee (including US national employee) in Thailand.

Thus, in addition to meeting the required capital amount of a minimum of Bt 3 million stipulated under Thailand’s Foreign Business Act, if a US corporation will be seconding foreign nationals (including US nationals) to work as employees of the entity in Thailand, the entity in Thailand will be additionally required to meet the Foreign Employment Act requirement and have at least Bt 2 million of paid-up “capital” in Thailand for each foreign national employee.

Is Legal Marijuana Bigger Than The Internet of Things?

The greatest innovation in history –

Nothing on Earth today (and I mean nothing at all), not smartphones, automotives, aerospace, real estate, gold, oil, software, biotechnology, nothing… is growing as much or as fast as the market for legal marijuana.

Consider this: By 2020, the market for legal marijuana will top $22.8 billion (not million, but billion with a B).The legal market for cannabis “could be bigger than the National Football League, which saw $12 billion of revenue in 2015. Between 2016 and 2029, the projected growth of marijuana is expected to reach $100 billion – 1,308% growth.

Estimates place the number of some time marijuana users in the neighborhood of 50 million people. As many as 7.6 million indulge on a daily basis. Out of the 83.3 million milllennials, fully 68%of them want cannabis to be legal and available. Once legalization takes hold everywhere, dozens of already established firms – in the tobacco industry… in agriculture and irrigation… in pharmacueticals – are going to want to jump in without hesitation. And if you want more proof that marijuana is going mainstream, consider this…

On Nov 8th, tens of millions of Americans in nine states headed to the polls and voted on the future of marijuana. California, Massachusetts, Maine and Nevada voted to legalize the recreational use of marijuana. And voters in Arkansas, Florida, North Dakota and Montana passed ballot initiatives legalizing medical marijuana. Only Arizona, where recreational cannabis was up for a vote, decided against legalization. Together, these states (excluding Arizona) represent a total population of 75 million people. That means one in five Americans – 20% of us – woke up on Aug 9th finding themselves in a state where medical and/or recreational marijuana is legal for adults 21 and over.

Even Hollywood celebrities are getting into the act. Many folks already know about the weed-related business activities of Snoop Dog, country music legend Willie Nelson and actor and comedian Tommy Chong. Fewer know that Grammy Award winning singer Melissa Etheridge is developing her own line of cannabis-infused wine and TV talk show host Whoopi Goldberg is launching a line of medical marijuana products aimed at women. And people listen to Hollywood icons. Nothing is more mainstream than the TV sitcom.

On July 13th in 2016, Variety revealed that Netflix is planning to air a sitcom set inside a legal pot dispensary. Called DisJointed, the show is the brainchild of TV genius Chuck Lorre, creator of such mainstream blockbusters as The Big Bang Theory and Two and a Half Men. A recent poll by Quinnipiac University found that 89 percent of voters in the United States believe that adults should be allowed legal access to medical marijuana when a doctor prescribes it. And the U.S.A. is not the only country poised to loosen the reins on marijuana. Israel, Canada, Spain, Mexico, Australia, Uruguay, Jamaica, Germany and Columbia have either legalized or decriminalized possession.

Since 1972, marijuana has been classified as a Schedule 1 controlled substance. Schedule 1 drugs are those considered to lack medical use and present a high potential for abuse. As a Schedule 1 drug, marijuana gets grouped alongside heroin, LSD, and ecstasy. But in the face of mounting pressure from the doctors, medical researchers, state governments and Congress, the Drug Enforcement Agency (DEA) have come under pressure to downgrade marijuana to a Schedule II drug, or maybe even a Schedule III.

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, by 2030 one fifth of the population – 72 million Americans – will be 65 or older. Those Baby Boomers will all confront a slew of age-related ailments, such as glaucoma, cancer, arthritis and back pain. As it happens, cannabis-based remedies are uniquely suited to treating those diseases. So, as the elderly population grows, so will the size of the medical marijuana market. Social acceptance of cannabis will grow as well, as millions of people discover the benefits of medical marijuana for themselves.

A single marijuana dispensary could bring in more than $676 million a year. Not all of that cash comes from weed itself. Most folks have already heard about things like “pot brownies.” But the market for marijuana “edibles” goes for beyond that. There are weed desserts and weed energy drinks. In fact, we’re even about to see the opening of the world’s first weed distillery.

For people averse to inhaling smoke, there are sites that offer THC-laden capsules, lip balms, hash bath oils, topical compound, and even THC patches that provide “accurate dosing… a quick onset and unsurpassed duration.” Thirsty users can enjoy THC-infused coffees, sodas, and sparkling waters. Aside from the market boom in recreational cannabis, medicinal marijuana and derivatives have also been seeing brisk growth, and for good reason.

Cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy and radiation usually lose their appetite and have sensitive stomachs. But if they don’t eat, the treatments aren’t as effective. Cannabis has been proven to help stimulate the appetite and settle the stomach. There is also new work being done with cannabis oil that shows promise treating epilepsy, multiple sclerosis, some cancers, and even rheumatoid arthritis. The oil is also effective for insomnia.

For most of the 20th century, doctors knew little about the working of out most important organ, the human brain. Brain cells dictate almost one of our sensations, thoughts, and actions sending signals that trigger appetite and hunger. Marijuana seems to bridge the gap. The voters in state after start are quickly coming to an agreement that cannabis is in fact medicine. Momentum is only going in one direction.